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Elon Musk’s Long Obsession With Sabotage

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“The forces arrayed against us are many and incredibly powerful,” Musk wrote in a different email, sent to Tesla employees in February 2017 after a former production worker wrote in detail on Medium about the company’s working conditions—long hours, “excessive mandatory overtime,” a shortage of manpower, and frequent injuries. “This is David vs. Goliath if David were six inches tall!” Musk said.

Musk considered “outside forces” in 2016, when a SpaceX rocket exploded on the launchpad as it fueled up for an engine test. The company examined seriously the possibility of sabotage in its investigation of the incident. “We literally thought someone had shot the rocket,” Musk said in an interview with Christian Davenport, a Washington Post reporter, published in Davenport’s 2018 book, The Space Barons: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and the Quest to Colonize the Cosmos.“We found things that looked like bullet holes, and we calculated that someone with a high-powered rifle, if they had shot the rocket in the right location, the exact same thing would have happened.”

SpaceX even got the U.S. government involved. “[W]e put pressure on the Air Force and the [Federal Aviation Administration] to go collect whatever forensic data was possible,” Gwynne Shotwell, the president and CEO of SpaceX, told Davenport. “The first thing you do is think it’s some outside force, right. Because we couldn’t figure out how in the world this could have happened.”

Eventually, SpaceX engineers determined the cause of the explosion was a problem with a pressure vessel in a liquid oxygen tank on the rocket’s upper stage. The feds ruled out sabotage, too.

In moments of perceived nefariousness, Musk usually asks his employees for their attentiveness for future threats. He did the same this week. “Please be extremely vigilant, particularly over the next few weeks as we ramp up the production rate to 5k/week,” he wrote in the email to his employees. “This is when outside forces have the strongest motivation to stop us.”

Worker safety at Tesla has been the subject of several investigations in last year, including by BuzzFeed, The Guardian, and the Center for Investigative Reporting. Musk has emphasized that employees have several outlets for their vigilance besides the press, encouraging them to bring concerns to their managers, safety representatives at the company, or the human-resources department. If employees want to be anonymous, they can register their notes through something called the Integrity Hotline. Musk referred to it in his email to staff in 2017, saying the resource “applies broadly to any problems you notice at our company.”

The hotline’s name fits nicely with Musk’s philosophy on employee loyalty, or lack thereof. Integrity: “adherence to moral and ethical principles; soundness of moral character; honesty.” The name reads like a warning. It automatically bestows any incoming concerns with the benefit of belief. Complaints made elsewhere—in the press, in lawsuits, in the handling of sensitive information, true or false—won’t get the same treatment.

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MotherHydra
11 hours ago
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Elon intimately knows all of the nefarious players he's pissed off. I believe every word of what he says about Tesla's sabotage.
Space City, USA
glenn
10 hours ago
Exactly ... lets's see who he's pissed off: Oil and gas monopolists, oil producing nations, Russia (rockets+ oil), coal and nuclear producer, ULA/Boing, unions/UAW, climate change denialists, flat-earthers.... have I forgotten anyone?
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jepler
7 hours ago
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I had totally forgotten the later walked back claims of that SpaceX launch sabotage, supposedly done from the roof of rival Blue Origin, was it? Ah, no, it was ULA. https://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/10/04/spacex_searches_for_falcon_rocket_sabotage/
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm

TP-Link’s new mesh router can control smart home gadgets

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TP-Link is launching its second mesh router today, the Deco M9 Plus, and it comes with two notable upgrades over the original around speed and smart home functionality.

The first is the more common feature: this is a tri-band router, instead of a dual band one, which means it should allow for even faster speeds. Like most tri-band routers, the M9 Plus sets up a dedicated network for communication between router units, allowing for faster operation for the networks connected to your phone and computer.

TP-Link’s first mesh router, the Deco M5, was only a dual-band model, which is what you’ll usually find on routers, and tends to be a bit cheaper. But at this point, most mesh systems offer both dual- and tri-band options, so there isn’t...

Continue reading…

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MotherHydra
11 hours ago
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Article fails to mention if this has a hard-coded admin password like their other, vulnerable networking gear.
Space City, USA
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5 Resistor Kits compared | Cool Tools

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Round up of inexpensive resistor kits

In this video I’m going to show you 5 different resistor kits for electronic projects. I found all of these on Amazon.

Whether you’re just getting started with electronics or you’re an old pro, a well organized assortment of resistors is incredibly useful.

The good news is that there are a bunch of options you can quickly get on Amazon. The bad news is that the quality and organization is hit or miss. So I’m going to show you 5 options.

Let’s start out with this one from Yobett. On paper, this one seems like a crazy deal for around $17. You get 166 different ¼ watt resistor values, 10 resistors per value. It comes packed and labeled and there’s a little chart inside with all the values listed.

But I have two problems with this. First, once you dig around for the resistor you need the organization falls apart almost immediately.

Second, the leads on these resistors are these thin, wimpy legs that aren’t breadboard friendly. And I’ve found this problem with a lot of resistors I’ve bought through eBay or Amazon. If you’re used to a solid, Radio Shack style of resistor lead, these will disappoint.

Next up, at just $9, there’s the RexQualis 22 value kit. You get 550 ¼ watt resistors, all separately bagged and labeled with big, legible numbers. It also includes a resistor code cheat sheet.

I like this set. The organization is great. There’s not a lot of different values, but you get the most useful and common range, from 10 ohms up to 1 megaohm. My only complaint is that the resistors still have these wimpy legs, similar to the other kit. Fine for through-hole PCB projects, but not great for breadboarding or point-to-point stuff.

Next up is the Elegoo resistor kit. It’s around $11, and comes with 525 ¼ watt resistors across 17 values.

This one comes in a neat, plastic case. Each value comes in its own individual bag, clearly labeled. You also get a resistor code chart and a list of all the included values.

The problem with this one is that there’s no linear order to how it’s organized, or any way to really keep them in order. You just hunt for what you want throw it back in.

The leads are a little stiffer on these guys. You can breadboard with these, but they’re still a little squishy.

Now here’s my personal favorite. This 16 value kit from Joe Knows Electronics isn’t the best value or most complete kit. But for around $8 you get an individually bagged assortment that’s clearly labeled and will stay organized.

The leads are relatively stiff. They’re a classic beige color because they’re 5% carbon film style. And you get a code chart inside the lid. A few extra values in here would be nice, but this covers the most common breadboard project values, and there’s enough room in here that I could pop in a few bags from the other kits and keep them organized here.

Now, I was so impressed by the way they did this kit that I also ordered up their $20 860 piece kit with 86 values.

It’s the same idea, but the box is larger, you get more values, and the resistors themselves are a more precise quality that use copper leads. I find the whole thing a little overkill for me, and honestly none of these really delivered the old school lead stiffness I was hoping for.

So that’s a look at some of the different resistor kits you can buy on Amazon. There are a bunch out there, but my advice after looking at all of these is to consider organization over quantity.

Yobett 166 Values 1/4w Resistors pack

REXQualis 22 Values 1/4W 1% Resistor Kit Assortment

Elegoo 17 Values 1% Resistor Kit Assortment

Joe Knows Electronics 1/4W Resistor Starter Kit

Joe Knows Electronics 1/4W 1% 86 Value 860 Piece Resistor Kit

-- Donald Bell 06/19/18
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MotherHydra
11 hours ago
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Space City, USA
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Google to Fix Location Data Leak in Google Home, Chromecast — Krebs on Security

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With my attack demo however, I’ve been consistently getting locations within about 10 meters of the device

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MotherHydra
18 hours ago
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What the fuck but also of course some shitty JavaScript is doing this.
Space City, USA
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WhenWorks

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New iOS app and web service that makes it easy for people to book appointments with you. From their blog announcement, on what makes WhenWorks unique:

There are many competitive services in this space. What they all have in common is that they are purely web-based solutions. What makes WhenWorks unique is that it is a mobile app that integrates directly with the Calendar app on your iOS device, is far easier to configure and use, more secure, and always with you when you need it.

WhenWorks supports all of the leading calendar services (iCloud, Google Calendar, Office 365 and Outlook.com) but is particularly well-suited for those who use iCloud, due to its deep integration with the built-in Calendar on iOS.

WhenWorks was founded by John Chaffee, of BusyMac and, back in the day, Now Up-to-Date fame, and he’s put together a really good team. The pricing is outstanding too: 14-day free trial, free-to-use for up to five appointments per month after that, and just $5/month for the pro account with no limits.

It’s a really great app, and setting it up couldn’t be easier. Worth checking it out just to examine the UI and on-boarding process, and if you’re the sort of person who has a busy calendar packed with appointments, you’re nuts if you don’t try it.

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MotherHydra
18 hours ago
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I've only recently started using calendly so I might as well test this out with my work Exchange account.
Space City, USA
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Is Apple really killing Mac gaming? Of course not

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By Ric Molina of MacGamer HQ

Apple’s WWDC 2018 is now over and while I was hoping for exciting news regarding Metal and Mac gaming, but quite the opposite happened. Apple announced that with the next version of MacOS, called Mojave, OpenGL will be deprecated. 

Mojave.jpg

People were quick to draw conclusions: mainly, no more OpenGL = no more games = the end of Mac gaming. I went out and asked several developers what they really thought about the end of OpenGL.

As said by every developer we talked to, OpenGL is eventually going away and that's a good thing. In fact, Metal, the technology that will replace it, is so much better, Mac gaming won't only survive it, it will become better because of it.

Don't believe me? Check out this list with every Mac game that supports Metal. You'll be impressed.


Like this article? Consider supporting Apple World Today with a $5 monthly Team AWT membership.



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MotherHydra
18 hours ago
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"Mac gaming" LOL. Why do people persist with this?
Space City, USA
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jepler
11 hours ago
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apropos of nothing, steam has 47743 windows games, 17671 mac os x games, and 11491 linux games. That means only 13% of steam games are on Mac and not on Linux. Nevermind that 63% are on neither, only on Windows..
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
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