network engineer, cloud infrastructure fluffer, fascinated with the machinations of the tech industry, friend to Cthulu and animals everywhere
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Project Power [Maker Update #61]

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This week, a solar-powered plant monitor, Dale and Naomi make up, a macro for your GoPro, and Make’s desktop fabrication guide. The Cool Tool this week is the DLI IoT Relay. Shownotes.

-- Donald Bell

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MotherHydra
3 hours ago
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Space City, USA
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iPhone SE 2 Rumored to Launch in First Half of 2018 ➝

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Joe Rossignol, writing for MacRumors:

Apple will release a second-generation iPhone SE in the first half of 2018, according to China’s Economic Daily News.

The report claims the tentatively named iPhone SE 2 will be assembled exclusively by Taiwanese manufacturer Wistron at its factory in Bengaluru, India, where some assembly of the current iPhone SE occurs.

The rumored release date window lines up with an earlier report from Focus Taiwan claiming a new iPhone SE will ship in the first quarter of 2018, which encompasses January through March of next year.

The iPhone 6S and iPhone 8 have eliminated my interest in 4-inch iPhones, but I know the form factor continues to have a devoted fanbase. My wife being one of them. Not a month goes by without her asking if there are any rumors of a new iPhone SE. She has no interest in carrying a larger phone — it’s not comfortable for her to hold and none of them fit in her jeans’ pockets. She’s going to be very happy about this rumor. And the supposed release window is conveniently timed — it’ll be about two years after she purchased her current iPhone SE, which is exactly when she planned to buy a new phone.

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MotherHydra
21 hours ago
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Nice timing. Also good to see Apple’s India investment bear fruit.
Space City, USA
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ADAM FREELAND - WE WANT YOUR SOUL - YouTube

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ADAM FREELAND - WE WANT YOUR SOUL
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MotherHydra
1 day ago
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A classic, now more relevant than ever.
Space City, USA
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Ring’s new $100,000 doorbell is encrusted with sapphires, diamonds, and gold

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While Black Friday deals can help you buy up smart home appliances on the cheap, the opposite also exists for users looking for a taste of luxury. Smart home accessory maker Ring just revealed a limited edition video doorbell encrusted in jewels. The very poshly named Ring Elite Crown Jewel has 2,077 sapphires and 40 diamonds set into an 18-karat gold faceplate, all made by Bijan Jewelry.

The Elite Crown Jewel’s video doorbell components are based on Ring’s Video Doorbell Elite, a slim model with high-end features like HD video and infrared night vision. The Video Doorbell Elite usually goes for $499.99 at Best Buy and $450 at Amazon, but with the extra decorations, the Elite Crown Jewel’s price tag has been bumped up to $100,000.

There...

Continue reading…

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MotherHydra
1 day ago
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Why?
Space City, USA
jhamill
1 day ago
why not?
MotherHydra
1 day ago
Fair enough!
jhamill
1 day ago
I mean, someone will buy it because they can so why not sell it to that person?
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Misunderstanding Digital Data – Kirkville

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I’ve been browsing hi-fi equipment lately, thinking about upgrading some of my stuff. As is often the case, I have encountered some egregious bullshit, both in what manufacturers say, and in the way publications review products.

Case in point, this CD transport. First, you need to understand the difference between a CD transport and a CD player. The former merely reads that data on an optical disc and sends it to the next element in a chain – either a DAC or an amplifier or receiver that has its own DAC – over digital outputs. These are generally either Toslink or coaxial connectors.

A CD player, on the other hand, contains its own DAC, so it outputs analog audio. Some CD players also have digital outputs, allowing them to be used as transports.

You would use a CD transport if you have an external DAC (or your amplifier or receiver has its own DAC) and want to benefit from its audio quality. If you do have an external DAC, there’s really no point in paying for an expensive CD player, because all it is is a standard CD drive – with some extra electronics – and a DAC.

In other words, a CD transport has no real effect on sound quality; it is just a passthrough device to send data from a disc to a DAC.

So. This CD transport, according to the manufacturer, actually:

Pulls more data from the disc than typical disc-reading systems

Because, you know, your cheap CD player can only read the audible part of the disc; this one gets the bits that you can’t hear; or something.

One of the key elements of a CD transport or player is the error correction it provides. This helps “fill in” missing bits, when the CD is not read correctly. It’s entirely possible that this CD transport has better error correction; the manufacturer says:

• Up to 5 times fewer data errors
• Reads more data ‘right first time’ than any other CD system

This said, CD errors that are corrected are miniscule. There are two types of errors, C1 and C2 errors. There are also CU errors, which are those that are present after error correction, and generally make a disc unplayable (making it skip, for example). The CD is a mature technology, and manufacturers know how to make CD players – and transports – that reduce error correction. Suggesting that there are fewer data errors doesn’t mean that it’s not detecting errors on disc, but rather errors in the device actually reading the data. A $20 CD-Rom drive can read data without errors quite well; you can see this whenever you copy data from a CD to a computer. If there are read errors, then the files are corrupted and cannot be copied. Unlike with music, data needs to maintain integrity; error correction works on CDs because music has extra data allowing it to be corrected, to adapt to discs that are damaged or smudged. So the above is most likely an exaggeration.

However, What Hi-Fi, that audio publication that is the gift that keeps on giving, goes much further. They claim that this CD transport:

never sounds clinical or forced. It’s a truly accomplished performer that you could listen to endlessly.

Because they somehow think that the CD transport and its bits somehow affect the quality of the sound that comes out of their speakers. Again, error correction does matter, but how would that equate to this description:

Florence + The Machine’s You’ve Got The Love sounds crystal clear, astonishingly nimble and with a staggering amount of detail. The CD t breezes through the upbeat rhythm, while Florence Welch’s soaring vocals sound refined and smooth with no hint of clipping or brightness.

Or this:

The Inception soundtrack shows off just how nuanced and subtly dynamic the CD t is. It’s not just about the deep bass, but also about revealing the varied textures and layers of that rumbling bass note.

Or this:

It’s a remarkably precise performer, ripping through the rapid-fire drum intro on Van Halen’s Hot For Teacher with effortless speed and accuracy. Each instrument is easily placed in the spacious soundstage, and we love how musical and fluid the transport sounds.

What Hi-Fi thinks that the bits that this device sends to a DAC are better than average:

Its level of transparency, clarity and insight is unrivalled [sic] at this price, and is an effortless and musical listen.

In other words, this CD transport has better bits.

Uh, okay.

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MotherHydra
1 day ago
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I love this series.
Space City, USA
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The Whole Pantry

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Mitchel Broussard:

After facing a wave of controversy in March over reports of false claims made towards her cancer diagnosis, Australian indie developer Belle Gibson this week spoke out, admitting that “none of it’s true” in regards to her ever having cancer (via News.com.au).

Last month, when $300,000 of her app sales failed to find its promised home at certain charities, the legitimacy of her cancer claims began to be questioned. Gibson is the founder of The Whole Pantry, a healthy lifestyle and diet app that focuses on naturally-occurring ingredients and solutions to complicated recipes.

Matt Novak (via John Gordon):

When the Apple Watch launched in 2015, Belle Gibson was touted by Apple as a star. Not only had Gibson supposedly cured her own cancer through healthy eating, she now had an app for both the iPhone and Apple Watch that could help others do the same. But now that her own cancer and “cure” have been exposed as fake, people are asking what responsibility Apple had to the public.

[…]

When the press started asking hard questions and raising doubts about her astonishing claims in April of 2015, Apple’s internal emails about their star app developer show that the company was ready to stand by Gibson.

MattCastaway:

This is the second-worst instance of Apple falling for “natural cancer cure” quackery.

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MotherHydra
1 day ago
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No words.
Space City, USA
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