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You Want 20% for Handing Me a Muffin? The Awkward Etiquette of iPad Tipping

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MotherHydra
15 hours ago
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This is pretty simple to sort out: Barista makes my coffee? Tip. That is a skill one hones. Just taking my card at the register? No tip, no skill required.
Space City, USA
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Is this common Japanese phrase for “goodbye” the reason for Japan’s crazy overtime hours?

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When you’re leaving the office before your coworkers, you don’t tell them “Sayonara,” you tell them “I’m being rude.”

Japan has a complicated relationship with the concept of overtime work. On the one hand, pride in your profession and going above and beyond the bare minimum for the sake of the group are cornerstones of Japanese culture, and both have deep and direct connections to the peace and economic prosperity that Japan has enjoyed for so much of the post-war era. But at the same time, a societal expectation that employees should be willing to regularly put in several hours at the office after their shifts are supposed to end can pose a serious danger to people’s mental and physical health.

In recent years, there’s been an increased effort by companies and workers’ advocacy groups to reduce the amount of overtime Japanese employees feel obligated to do. However, Japanese Twitter user @AdmiralYamabiko feels that all the progressive managers and government guidelines Japan throws at the problem won’t do any good until one part of Japanese linguistics gets reformed too.

Spend even a day in a Japanese office, and you’ll hear the phrase “Osaki ni shitsurei shimasu,” which is something people say to any coworkers still in the office as they walk out the door on their way home. However, even though that makes it functionally a substitute for “goodbye,” the literal meaning of the phrase is:

“I am being rude by leaving before you.”

▼ Pictured on the right: A jerk?

Granted, the frequency with which osaki ni shitsurei shimasu gets used gives it a bit more of a familiar feel to native Japanese speakers, but the sentiment is still “Excuse me for going home before you,” with an explicitly stated acknowledgment that by leaving the office first, you’re putting yourself first by not helping your coworkers out with the remaining workload of the staff as a whole.

“Every time I hear someone say ‘Let’s try to limit our overtime to as little as possible,’” tweets @AdmiralYamabiko, “I think it’s going to be impossible as long as people still say ‘Osaki ni shitsurei shimasu.’”

So what would @AdmiralYamabiko like to see replace the phrase? His suggestion is that at the designated time employees’ shift is supposed to end, the company should strike a war gong, and whoever’s ready to lead should stalwartly make their way to the exit while boldly announcing “Ichiban nori,” a phrase used by warlords of the feudal era that roughly translates to “I’m leading the charge!” Doing so would change the image of whoever’s leaving the office first from lazy clock-watcher to valiant vanguard leader, and thus encourage anyone still working to wrap up as soon as possible so they don’t fall behind the gallant head of the formation.

@AdmiralYamabiko’s idea produced online reactions such as:

“I like it. It makes going home seem like a positive thing. You could even have the company president get in on it by ordering everyone to ‘Withdraw from the field of battle!’”

“But what if someone else says ‘Wait! It could be a trap! Hold your positions!’”

“It might only make a small difference, but I think it’s worth a shot to start trying to limit how often we say ‘Osaki ni shitsurei shimasu.’”

“We need to start thinking of people who can finish their work without doing overtime as heroes.”

Unfortunately, that last point is something that’s not so simple in Japanese culture. Yes, being a capable, productive worker is definitely considered worthy of respect in Japan, but unless everyone else is ready to go home too, there’s likely to be a segment of the population that feels it’s selfish to be the first to clock out for the day. Because of that, managers and human resource departments continue to bear a huge responsibility to make sure staff sizes and individual workloads are kept at reasonable levels.

It’s also worth pointing out that just like English-speakers sometimes use the phrase “Excuse me” without actually feeling any deep or genuine guilt, it’d be an exaggeration to say that Japanese people are actually wracked with shame every time they say “Osaki ni shitsurei shimasu.” Still, a shift in semantics so that workers don’t have to apologize for going home when their shifts end could be an important step in Japan achieving a more moderate work/life balance.

Source: Twitter/@AdmiralYamabiko via Jin
Top image: Pakutso
Insert images: Pakutaso (1, 2)



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MotherHydra
16 hours ago
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Ichiban nori!
Space City, USA
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The World’s Largest Apple Collection Needs a New Home

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Francois Murphy and Leonhard Foeger for Reuters:

Over the years since he began working for a company that repaired Apples in Vienna in the 1980s, Roland Borsky’s collection has grown to roughly 1,100 computers, he says – far more than the 472 items at Prague’s Apple Museum, which says it is the world’s biggest private collection of Apple products.

“Just as others collect cars and live in a little box to afford them, so it is with me,” he said in his office, which is so packed with dusty items like a wall of old monitors that he has moved most of them to a warehouse outside the city.

Borsky’s Mac repair shop has struggled since an Apple Store opened up in Vienna, and he is looking for places to show his collection to generate income, but may be forced to sell it all off. That’s a real shame, and I hope these machines find a good home.

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MotherHydra
16 hours ago
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Independent repair shops artificially suffer and struggle due to Apple's decisions. Apple's response: "But look at this phat stack of cash, call me G-money!"
Space City, USA
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Limited edition Xbox One makes Taco Bell ‘bong’ noise at startup

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Xbox One X in partnership with Taco Bell.

A strange but intriguing new promotion from Taco Bell and Microsoft will soon make Doritos and Mountain Dew passé for the gaming elite.

Taco Bell customers who purchase a double chalupa box for $5 beginning tomorrow will automatically be entered to win a very special limited edition Xbox One X console that includes “Taco Bell’s famous ‘ring’ when powered on,” according to a press release. Yes, Taco Bell’s infamous little bell that rings at the end of commercials. It’s like Pavlov’s dog experiment come to life: hear the ring when you power up your Xbox One X, hit up Taco Bell.

The console, which includes a nifty monochromatic design scheme exclusive to Taco Bell and Microsoft’s promotion, comes with an “Xbox Elite Wireless Controller...

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MotherHydra
19 hours ago
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WANT.
Space City, USA
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Twitter bans NPC accounts

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MotherHydra
19 hours ago
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Twitter banning satire accounts. Let that sink in.
Space City, USA
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Huawei Claims Their Newly Announced Tablet Is A “Better Portable Game Machine” Than Nintendo Switch

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Technology manufacturer Huawei has announced a new tablet which they believe will compete directly with the dedicated video game machine, the Nintendo Switch. Instead of comparing the product to other rival tablets they are going after Nintendo with this one. The tablet in question is the newly announced 7.2 inch Mate 20 X tablet which […]







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MotherHydra
20 hours ago
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Doubt. When the only metric you can hand-waive about is hardware specs you've really missed the boat.
Space City, USA
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